Snuggle Coats – Giving the fur back

Snuggle Coats

Link to Snuggle Coats website


How does it work?

In simple terms, real fur in all forms of clothing – coats, stoles, capes and hats are donated to Snuggle Coats and these are disassembled and passed onto Animal Groups to rehabilitate and enrich the lives of animals in their care.

Furs provide a more natural environment for the animals as compared to towels or blankets and the animals are often heard heaving audible sighs before snuggling into these fur donations. These furs can act as a surrogate for injured wildlife during the rehabilitation process.

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FAWNA Fundraising Day

Sea Acres Poster

Click to view the Poster for Sea Acres Open Day for FAWNA

In recognition of Threatened Species Day in the second week in September, Sea Acres Rainforest Centre is holding a Family Open Day for Wildlife on Sunday, 13 September from 10.00 am. to 4 p.m.

Instead of the normal entrance fee, each adult is asked to give a gold coin donation that will go to the local volunteer wildlife rescue and rehabilitation group, FAWNA – For Australian Wildlife Needing Aid.

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FAWNA supports Threatened Species Day 2015

In recognition of Threatened Species Day in the second week in September, Sea Acres Rainforest Centre is holding a Family Open Day for Wildlife on Sunday, 13 September from 10.00 am. to 4 p.m. Instead of the normal entrance fee, each adult is asked to give a gold coin donation that will go to the local volunteer wildlife rescue and rehabilitation group, FAWNA— For Australian Wildlife Needing Aid. Continue Reading →

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Meet the new furry friend discovered by researchers in the Northern Territory

Researchers in the Northern Territory believe they have found a new marsupial species, and the process of identifying it could take them all the way to the British Museum.

The undescribed species of glider was first captured for analysis in the Northern Territory by researchers at Charles Darwin University, and is an animal Australia knows little about.

“We made our first sighting in Kakadu in October 2013,” said Professor Sue Carthew, lead researcher on the Northern Glider Project.

“It used to be thought sugar gliders occurred across the Top End, all along the Eastern Seaboard and New Guinea. But we have genotyped gliders from a whole range of areas and found that the northern Australian gliders are quite different.”

Gliders have been known to exist in the Northern Territory since the 1800s, but few studies have ever been conducted on the furry creatures, making Professor Carthew’s study the first of its kind.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/environment/conservation/new-species-of-glider-discovered-in-the-northern-territory-20150812-gixnym.html

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